Forensic Artist Uncovers ‘Formula of Deception’ in Carrie Stuart Parks’ New Thriller [REVIEW]

The motion of drawing

An artist uses her talents to uncover long-buried secrets in Carrie Stuart Parks’ Formula of Deception. (Photo by Kendra, Flickr)

She did everything she could to escape. She got out of town. She moved to a remote location. She changed her name and hit the reboot button on her life. But the past has finally caught up with her. Does she have the mettle to survive the approaching storm once again? Find out in Carrie Stuart Park’s captivating new thriller, Formula of Deception.  Read more of this post

Family Comes First at ‘The House at Saltwater Point’ [REVIEW]

Hand disappearing into the sea

When her sister vanishes off her boat without a trace, everyone is a suspect in Colleen Coble’s The House at Saltwater Point. (Photo by Robert Couse-Baker, Flickr)

What was supposed to be a night out on the town with her sister turns into one woman’s nightmare as she discovers her sibling’s boat sprayed with blood. Who would want her sister dead? Will she ever discover the truth? Find out in Colleen Coble’s latest novel, The House at Saltwater Point.  Read more of this post

The Art of the Letter [GUEST POST]

Letters

Few things are as treasured as a personal letter received from someone we love. (Photo by Suzy Hazelwood, Flickr)

 

Letters. You know, the kind we get from a dear friend or relative on those rare occasions someone takes the time to put pen to paper and contact us through good old-fashioned snail mail. We love getting them, but these days our correspondence seems to have been reduced to nothing more than short-hand texts or emojis. That is why we love Rachel Hauck’s new novel, The Love Letter, a story which celebrates letters and their impact on us over time. In today’s guest post, she shows why they are still so important and how they connect us like no other medium. Enjoy! —Jathan & Heather Read more of this post

♦ Hope and Redemption are ‘What Blooms from Dust’ in James Markert’s New Novel [REVIEW]

A huge dust storm moves across the land during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.

A prodigal son. A child for sale. Both get a second chance in the midst of the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl in James Markert’s What Blooms from Dust. (Photo courtesy US Department of Agriculture, Flickr)

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I have always loved survivor stories: those tales where people beat the odds, transform their lives, and wind up with something better. So it brings me great pleasure to bring you our latest Diamond Review title, James Markert’s What Blooms from Dust. In this redemptive story set against the 1930s Dust Bowl, we are introduced to what may likely become two of modern literature’s most unforgettable characters.
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