WE SHALL NOT SHATTER: An Interview with Elaine Stock

Elaine Stock (Photo courtesy Elaine Stock, Facebook)

World War II has been the inspiration for a great deal of historical fiction. With so many angles to approach the global conflict and how it impacted everyone’s life—whether directly or indirectly—there are just countless stories to be told. As Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See made us examine the war from the vantage point of a blind girl in France, Elaine Stock’s new novel, We Shall Not Shatter demonstrates how the deaf community in Poland fared during the same time. It’s a fascinating glimpse into this aspect of our history that we have not considered before, and we are excited to share this book with you. We hope you find our interview with Elaine as fascinating as we did. Enjoy! —J&H

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Kurt Austin Must Save the Planet from a Chilling End in Clive Cussler and Graham Brown’s ‘Fast Ice’ [REVIEW]

Snow mobile
Kurt Austin heads to Antarctica in Fast Ice. (Photo courtesy Canva)

When a colleague vanishes in Antarctica, Kurt Austin and Joe Zavala set out on a rescue mission to the South Pole. Along the way, however, they encounter more than just icebergs and frosty temperatures. Now they also have to stop a madman from ending the world as we know it. Will they be able to save both their friend and the planet? Find out in Clive Cussler and Graham Brown’s Fast Ice.

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Cotton Malone Takes His 16th International Adventure in Steve Berry’s ‘The Kaiser’s Web’ [REVIEW]

Brandenburg Gate in Germany
A new day is dawning in Germany, but who will have the upper hand? (Photo courtesy Canva)

A secret dossier from a World War-II era Soviet spy. New information that could rewrite history. Will Cotton Malone be able to get to the truth before and save Europe from complete chaos? Find out in Steve Berry’s latest thriller, The Kaiser’s Web.

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Owen Matthews Reveals ‘An Impeccable Spy: Richard Sorge, Stalin’s Master Agent’ in Riveting New Book [REVIEW]

Richard Sorge

Richard Sorge: (left) His official Comintern identity photograph, Moscow, 1924; (right) his police photograph after his arrest. (Photo on left courtesy Owen Matthews/Photo on right by SPUTNIK Alamy Stock Photo)

Formidable. Fleckless. Brilliant. Richard Sorge is the kind of spy who could make James Bond jealous. The information he provided to his masters was spot on, his escapades legendary. Now it is your turn to discover one of the Soviet Union’s most revered operatives in Owen Matthews’ fascinating book, An Impeccable Spy. Read more of this post

Abandoned and Alone, a Young Boy Must Survive Andrew Taylor’s ‘The Second Midnight’ [REVIEW]

Prague

A father leaves his boy behind in Nazi-infested Prague in Andrew Taylor’s The Second Midnight. (Photo by Roman Boed, Flickr)

A world on the brink of war. A father with a secret mission. A son who becomes a pawn. Set against Nazi-invaded Czechoslovakia, a game of political espionage becomes a child’s fight for survival in Andrew Taylor’s classic, The Second Midnight. Read more of this post