‘The Clergyman’s Wife’ Takes A Fresh Look at a Classic Story [REVIEW]

Roses

Life looks different after a rose garden is planted in Molly Greeley’s The Clergyman’s Wife. (Photo courtesy Canva)

In Jane Austen’s day, women had well-defined roles in society. Never one to live life by other people’s rules, she frequently challenged the status quo, in print and in life. Now author Molly Greeley takes us back to the beloved world of Pride and Prejudice, where we meet a lonely woman destined for a normal life. But will a new acquaintance give her a chance for something more? Find out in The Clergyman’s Wife.
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Three Women Defy Time at ‘The Painted Castle’ [REVIEW]

Framlingham Castle

Framlingham Castle reflected in The Mere,at dawn. (Photo by Ian Dalgliesh, CC BY-SA 2.0)

A treasured painting. A mysterious library. Three women separated by time. What binds them together? And how will an ancient castle’s secrets link the future to the past? Find out in Kristy Cambron’s new Lost Castle novel, The Painted Castle. 
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Old Friends Reunite for ‘A Bitter Feast’ in Deborah Crombie’s Latest [REVIEW]

Small town in the hills

Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James are ready for a relaxing weekend in Deborah Crombie’s A Bitter Feast. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Wealthy friends, a charming village, and tasty eats come together in Deborah Crombie’s addictive new cozy mystery, A Bitter Feast. Here a fluke accident and possible murder mar what should be a thoroughly enchanting getaway for two of England’s best crime solvers and their family.  Read more of this post

Queens Don’t Play: Fear and Gender Equality in Elizabeth’s Court [GUEST POST]

Elizabeth Receiving Dutch Ambassadors, 1560s

Queen Elizabeth I lived during a precarious time for women. Still, she had a knack for handling the men in her life. (Elizabeth Receiving Dutch Ambassadors, 1560s by Levina Teerlinc, Public Domain)

We love a good mystery… especially when it transports us to a time and place we could never go on our own. In Suzanne M. Wolfe’s new novel, A Murder by Any Name, readers are taken to Elizabethan England, where the queen’s ladies in waiting are being killed off one by one, and only one man can find the killer. This premise made us wonder if while researching this story, whether or not Ms. Wolfe discovered any disparities between how the Queen dealt with men versus women. If so, to what extent did fear play a factor in how she dealt with each gender? The author answers all our questions in today’s fascinating guest post. Enjoy! —J&H Read more of this post

Captivating and Magical, ‘The Phantom Tree’ Delivers An Alternate Look at Tudor History [REVIEW]

The Phantom Tree

Two women bound by a pact, two enemies separated by centuries. Lose yourself in the pages of Nicola Cornick’s The Phantom Tree. (Illustration courtesy Graydon House)

When a long-lost Tudor portrait suddenly surfaces in the midst of a modern-day English festival, one woman’s carefully constructed life is turned on its ear. The face in the painting is as familiar as her own. But can it be? Did the woman in the portrait live? And if so, what secrets does she hold? Find out in Nicola Cornick’s engrossing new novel, The Phantom Tree. 
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