Readers Will Never Forget Their ‘Last Christmas in Paris’ [REVIEW]

Gifts

Before his life is over, he must go back to where it began in Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb’s Last Christmas in Paris. (Photo by justkids, Flickr)

The Great War changed the global landscape forever. Never before had the entire planet been engulfed in war, and yet at the time, no one had any idea just how long the conflict would last. Communities were flattened, families torn apart, and friends separated. Yet, despite it all, romance still managed to thrive and blossom amidst the ashes. Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb’s new novel, Last Christmas in Paris, recounts one such story.  Read more of this post

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Get Caught Up in the Romance of World War II on ‘The Way to London’ [REVIEW]

Steam locomotive

In the midst of World War II, Lucy Stanhope must leave everything she knows behind in Alix Rickloff’s The Way to London. (Photo by Tony Armstrong, Flickr)

A beautiful young socialite has everything a girl could want: wealth, privilege, and a one-of-a-kind wardrobe that speaks volumes about her personal style. She even has a special man in her life who seems to know her all too well. But with World War II raging around them, everything she holds dear is threatened and the future is anything but certain in Alix Rickloff’s gorgeous new novel, The Way to London.  Read more of this post

If Walls Could Talk, Imagine the Stories ‘The Address’ Could Tell [REVIEW]

The Dakota

In The Address, Fiona Davis captures two very disparate stories of love and madness within one of New York City’s most historic addresses, The Dakota. (Photo by Wally Gobetz, Flickr)

Visitors to New York City’s Upper West Side have undoubtedly seen the Dakota, an apartment building which opened back in 1884, back when the landscape was desolate and unpopulated. With its unusual looming rooftop, wrought iron monsters and tall forbidding windows, this historic structure lacks warmth and prods imaginations to run wild. Now, in The Address, Fiona Davis throws open the doors and invites us inside to tell us a haunting tale of love and murder and of two very different women living one hundred years apart.  Read more of this post

Six Literary Haunts Every Bibliophile Should Visit [PHOTOS]

Shannon Mckenna Schmidt

Shannon Mckenna Schmidt, co-author of National Geographic’s Novel Destinations, shares six of her favorite literary haunts.

Warning: Novel Destinations may inspire wanderlust. But rest assured, whether or not taking to the road is in the cards right now, the book offers an entertaining armchair journey. Rather than simply guiding readers to famous writers’ homes and haunts, Novel Destinations shares intriguing, little-known stories about the wordsmiths and the places where they lived, wrote, drew inspiration, and ventured themselves. Here are some of my favorite literary travel tales. Read more of this post

Jacqueline Winspear’s ‘In This Grave Hour’ Examines the Effects of War on the Human Psyche [REVIEW]

Britain declares war

The day Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain announces that Britain is once again at war, Maisie Dobbs is given a cold case to solve in Jacqueline Winspear’s IN THIS GRAVE HOUR. (Photo courtesy Wayne State University)

The last thing anyone wanted after the Great War was to be thrust into another melee. Families had already sacrificed so much, and nations were still recovering from the “last war.” In fact, psychologist and investigator Maisie Dobbs’ latest case has her investigating killings that occurred during that previous conflict. Will she be able to find the murderer? And what will she do when someone new arrives on her doorstep in need of assistance? Find out in Jacqueline Winspear’s In This Grave Hour. 
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