Jacqueline Winspear’s ‘In This Grave Hour’ Examines the Effects of War on the Human Psyche [REVIEW]

Britain declares war

The day Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain announces that Britain is once again at war, Maisie Dobbs is given a cold case to solve in Jacqueline Winspear’s IN THIS GRAVE HOUR. (Photo courtesy Wayne State University)

The last thing anyone wanted after the Great War was to be thrust into another melee. Families had already sacrificed so much, and nations were still recovering from the “last war.” In fact, psychologist and investigator Maisie Dobbs’ latest case has her investigating killings that occurred during that previous conflict. Will she be able to find the murderer? And what will she do when someone new arrives on her doorstep in need of assistance? Find out in Jacqueline Winspear’s In This Grave Hour. 
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Rhys Bowen Breaks Down Social Barriers ‘In Farleigh Field’ [REVIEW]

English manor

With the onset of WWII, everything is quickly changing for Lord Westerham and his family in Rhys Bowen’s In Farleigh Field. (Photo by Marc Pether-Longman, Flickr)

Spies. British aristocracy. A dead body. A love triangle. Rhys Bowen’s new World War II thriller, In Farleigh Field, has it all in spades, making for a truly delicious stand-alone novel that will delight fans of Masterpiece Theater’s Home Fires and Downton Abbey.  Read more of this post

Prepare to be Mesmerized by Martin Cruz Smith’s ‘The Girl from Venice’ [REVIEW]

Fisherman's shed off Pellestrina on the Venetian lagoon

Love blossoms in a fisherman’s humble home on the Venetian lagoon in Martin Cruz Smith’s The Girl from Venice.
(Photo by D’Arcy Vallance, Flickr)

World War II may be drawing to a close, but life is still far from safe when a quiet fisherman pulls a mysterious girl’s lifeless body from the drink. But who is she? Why do the Germans want her? And what can a humble peasant do to save both their lives? Find out in Martin Cruz Smith’s new standalone novel, The Girl from Venice. Read more of this post

Isabel Allende’s ‘The Japanese Lover’ Is A Timeless Tale Of Forbidden Love [REVIEW]

Gardenia Flower

A budding romance is forbidden in Isabel Allende’s THE JAPANESE LOVER. (Photo by Lenora Good, Flickr)

Many of us remember our first true love, the one who helped shape us into the person we are today. In Isabel Allende’s latest novel, The Japanese Lover, she weaves a story that captures the true essence of that first romance: from its initial excitement that enthralls the senses, to its buoyant passion, and finally to its devastating, heartbreaking end. Read more of this post

Kristin Hannah’s ‘The Nightingale’ Is A Hauntingly Poignant Tale [REVIEW]

William Wordsworth once said, “Life is divided into three terms – that which was, which is, and which will be. Let us learn from the past to profit by the present, and from the present, to live better in the future.” Read more of this post