Sometimes ‘The Crooked Path’ is the Most Rewarding [REVIEW]

South Africa

In South Africa, a woman finds the road to happiness to be The Crooked Path. (Photo by Julie Laurent, Flickr)

When a South African young girl who never seems quite good enough in her own mind has her heart crushed and her dreams shattered, will she allow her personal tragedy to define her life or will she forge ahead more determined than ever to construct her own destiny? Find out in Irma Joubert’s The Crooked Path. Read more of this post

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Get Caught Up in the Romance of World War II on ‘The Way to London’ [REVIEW]

Steam locomotive

In the midst of World War II, Lucy Stanhope must leave everything she knows behind in Alix Rickloff’s The Way to London. (Photo by Tony Armstrong, Flickr)

A beautiful young socialite has everything a girl could want: wealth, privilege, and a one-of-a-kind wardrobe that speaks volumes about her personal style. She even has a special man in her life who seems to know her all too well. But with World War II raging around them, everything she holds dear is threatened and the future is anything but certain in Alix Rickloff’s gorgeous new novel, The Way to London.  Read more of this post

Meet the ‘Sons and Soldiers’ Who Never Gave Up Hope [REVIEW]

Martin Selling questions German SS captives near the front in France, 1944

Martin Selling questions German SS captives near the front in France, 1944. (Photo by US Army Signal Corps)

Martin Selling. Stephan Lewy. Guy Stern. These are just a few of the names that the history books seem to forget when recounting the treachery and bravado of World War II. Yet even though these men may not be household names, they are nevertheless three of America’s unsung heroes, men who not only survived Hitler’s Germany, but who rose up to fight back for their friends, for family, and for vengeance. Now their account is finally being told in Bruce Henderson’s brilliant new book, Sons and Soldiers.  Read more of this post

Discover How More Than 300,000 Soldiers Survived Impossible Odds at ‘Dunkirk’ [REVIEW]

Fionn Whitehead in DUNKIRK

Fionn Whitehead as Tommy in the Warner Bros. Pictures action thriller, “DUNKIRK,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release. (Photo by Melinda Sue Gordon)

One of the biggest summer blockbusters coming to cinemas this summer is Dunkirk, award-winning writer/director Christopher Nolan’s captivating retelling of one of the most infamous moments of World War II: the daring evacuation of more than 300,000 Allied soldiers from a beach on the northern coast of France, just 305 kilometers north of Paris. But no matter how brilliant the film may be, there is obviously a lot of historical detail that can’t be packed into an hour and 46 minutes. That’s where Joshua Levine’s new book, Dunkirk: The History Behind the Major Motion Picture steps up to fill in the gaps.   Read more of this post

‘Beneath A Scarlet Sky’ is the Story Mark Sullivan Was Born to Write [REVIEW]

Duomo di Milano

When World War II arrives in Italy, not even the Duomo di Milano is safe. (Photo by Roberto Guerrini, Flickr)

World War II is one of those unique periods in time which seems to generate an unending supply of powerful stories. Partly, I think, it is because the atrocities people endured and the horrors they witnessed were so outrageous they are still difficult for us to fully comprehend at times. The flip side of the coin, however, is that these stories often celebrate the fortitude of the human spirit and mankind’s tenacious desire to survive even the most dire of circumstances. That is definitely true in Mark Sullivan’s new novel, Beneath A Scarlet Sky. Read more of this post