♦ Single Mom Takes a Stand in Wiley Cash’s ‘The Last Ballad’ [REVIEW]

Textile mill workers

In 1929, one woman took a stand for what is right and changed the course of American history. Discover her riveting story in Wiley Cash’s The Last Ballad. (Photo courtesy William Morrow, YouTube)

Diamond Review BannerThere have always been unsung heroes in America’s history, people seldom recognized for their significant impact on our culture and way of life, even when those changes came with great personal sacrifice. In Wiley Cash’s new novel, The Last Ballad, readers are introduced to one such woman in a book that is one of the most enthralling, authentic, and relevant novels we have read in some time. Read more of this post

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Meet the ‘Sons and Soldiers’ Who Never Gave Up Hope [REVIEW]

Martin Selling questions German SS captives near the front in France, 1944

Martin Selling questions German SS captives near the front in France, 1944. (Photo by US Army Signal Corps)

Martin Selling. Stephan Lewy. Guy Stern. These are just a few of the names that the history books seem to forget when recounting the treachery and bravado of World War II. Yet even though these men may not be household names, they are nevertheless three of America’s unsung heroes, men who not only survived Hitler’s Germany, but who rose up to fight back for their friends, for family, and for vengeance. Now their account is finally being told in Bruce Henderson’s brilliant new book, Sons and Soldiers.  Read more of this post

♦ ‘My Glory Was I Had Such Friends’ Is A Love Letter to the Power of Friendship [REVIEW]

Amy Silverstein and friends

Amy Silverstein and friends at her book launch party for My Glory Was I Had Such Friends.
(Photo via CBS Sunday Morning, YouTube)

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Amy Silverstein knows a thing or two about hearts. She is on her third one! But her second heart transplant almost didn’t happen. She’d almost given up on life when she got sick again, some 26 years after her first transplant. What she hadn’t counted on, however, was the immense power of friendship.  Read more of this post

Discover How More Than 300,000 Soldiers Survived Impossible Odds at ‘Dunkirk’ [REVIEW]

Fionn Whitehead in DUNKIRK

Fionn Whitehead as Tommy in the Warner Bros. Pictures action thriller, “DUNKIRK,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release. (Photo by Melinda Sue Gordon)

One of the biggest summer blockbusters coming to cinemas this summer is Dunkirk, award-winning writer/director Christopher Nolan’s captivating retelling of one of the most infamous moments of World War II: the daring evacuation of more than 300,000 Allied soldiers from a beach on the northern coast of France, just 305 kilometers north of Paris. But no matter how brilliant the film may be, there is obviously a lot of historical detail that can’t be packed into an hour and 46 minutes. That’s where Joshua Levine’s new book, Dunkirk: The History Behind the Major Motion Picture steps up to fill in the gaps.   Read more of this post

‘My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward’ Offers Insight Into the Pain of Mental Illness [REVIEW]

Woman in bed

When a man finds out that his wife is mentally ill, will he have the strength to stick by her? Find out in Mark Lukach’s powerful memoir, My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward. (Photo by Lawrence Murray, Flickr)

Nearly all of us are taught the classic stories where boy meets girl. But not every couple gets a “happy ever after.” Sometimes, even the most dazzling romances can get dark and twisty, especially when mental illness rears its ugly head. In his memoir My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward, Mark Lukach recounts the frightening tale of how his beautiful bride became someone he didn’t recognize, and what it took to keep his young family together.  Read more of this post