Meet World War II’s Courageous Nurses in ‘The Fire by Night’ [REVIEW]

Field hospital nurses

Meet some of the American military nurses who risked their lives during World War II in Teresa Messineo’s The Fire by Night. (Photo by Marion Doss, Flickr)

We’ve often heard, read, and watched epics about the brave men (and sometimes men who were barely more than boys) who courageously served in the various branches of the military during World War II. But we seldom hear about the women who sacrificed their youth and freedom to serve in wartime hot zones as military nurses who worked tirelessly to save lives and mend and watch over the injured soldiers who were carried in off the field, barely clinging to life. Teresa Messineo’s engrossing novel, The Fire by Night, finally brings these stories to dazzling, vivid life.   Read more of this post

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Readers Will Never Forget Their ‘Last Christmas in Paris’ [REVIEW]

Gifts

Before his life is over, he must go back to where it began in Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb’s Last Christmas in Paris. (Photo by justkids, Flickr)

The Great War changed the global landscape forever. Never before had the entire planet been engulfed in war, and yet at the time, no one had any idea just how long the conflict would last. Communities were flattened, families torn apart, and friends separated. Yet, despite it all, romance still managed to thrive and blossom amidst the ashes. Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb’s new novel, Last Christmas in Paris, recounts one such story.  Read more of this post

Sophfronia Scott Pays Homage to Literary Greats in ‘Unforgivable Love’ [REVIEW]

Gardenia

Like the flowers in her hair, everything about Mae Malveaux seems a little too perfect. (Photo by Pauline Rosenberg, Flickr)

What happens when you cross Dangerous Liaisons with The Color Purple? The answer may very well be Sophfronia Scott’s beautiful new novel, Unforgivable Love. Here, Harlem’s elite turn love into a tantalizing, precarious sport where everyone is fair game.  Read more of this post

‘Caroline’ Ingalls Was One Strong Ma [REVIEW]

Little House on the Prairie side view with wagon

When the Ingalls family left the comfort of Wisconsin, this was the place Caroline had to look forward to calling home. (Photo by Sheila Scarborough, Flickr)

Who didn’t grow up reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie books or watching the popular television series starring Melissa Gilbert, Michael Landon and Karen Grassle as Ma? For many of us, the Ingalls became such a part of our lives they almost became an extension of our own family. But in both the books and the show, the focus was almost always on the children. That’s why Sarah Miller’s new book, Caroline, is such a treat. Here, we finally get an insider’s look into the heart and mind of one of literature’s most beloved mothers.  Read more of this post

If Walls Could Talk, Imagine the Stories ‘The Address’ Could Tell [REVIEW]

The Dakota

In The Address, Fiona Davis captures two very disparate stories of love and madness within one of New York City’s most historic addresses, The Dakota. (Photo by Wally Gobetz, Flickr)

Visitors to New York City’s Upper West Side have undoubtedly seen the Dakota, an apartment building which opened back in 1884, back when the landscape was desolate and unpopulated. With its unusual looming rooftop, wrought iron monsters and tall forbidding windows, this historic structure lacks warmth and prods imaginations to run wild. Now, in The Address, Fiona Davis throws open the doors and invites us inside to tell us a haunting tale of love and murder and of two very different women living one hundred years apart.  Read more of this post