A KNIGHT AND A SPY 1410: Nine Questions for Simon Fairfax [INTERVIEW]

Knight on black horse
Simon Fairfax embellishes history in A Knight and a Spy 1410. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Intrepid spies, valiant knights, and the fair maidens who win their hearts. There are good reasons we romanticize the Medieval period and are captivated by its pageantry. Somehow, even now, the legends of iconic royals tease our imaginations and lure us back to their own era, centuries before any of us ever walked the Earth. It takes a deft writer to capture these stories on paper, to resurrect faded characters and bring old world history to vivid life. Yet that is exactly what author Simon Fairfax has done with his new series and its debut novel, A Knight and a Spy 1410. That’s why we were delighted to catch up with Simon and learn some of the stories behind the story in this insightful interview. Enjoy! —J&H

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Owen Matthews Reveals ‘An Impeccable Spy: Richard Sorge, Stalin’s Master Agent’ in Riveting New Book [REVIEW]

Richard Sorge

Richard Sorge: (left) His official Comintern identity photograph, Moscow, 1924; (right) his police photograph after his arrest. (Photo on left courtesy Owen Matthews/Photo on right by SPUTNIK Alamy Stock Photo)

Formidable. Fleckless. Brilliant. Richard Sorge is the kind of spy who could make James Bond jealous. The information he provided to his masters was spot on, his escapades legendary. Now it is your turn to discover one of the Soviet Union’s most revered operatives in Owen Matthews’ fascinating book, An Impeccable Spy. Read more of this post

‘The Earl in Black Armor’ is a Master Class in Irish History [REVIEW]

Ireland

Two spies fight to save their way of life in Nancy Blanton’s The Earl in Black Armor. (Photo by Canva)

Star-crossed lovers. Secret spies. An enigmatic man with a treacherous agenda. History and intrigue collide across the lush Irish landscape in Nancy Blanton’s brilliant new historical novel, The Earl in Black Armor.  Read more of this post

Queens Don’t Play: Fear and Gender Equality in Elizabeth’s Court [GUEST POST]

Elizabeth Receiving Dutch Ambassadors, 1560s

Queen Elizabeth I lived during a precarious time for women. Still, she had a knack for handling the men in her life. (Elizabeth Receiving Dutch Ambassadors, 1560s by Levina Teerlinc, Public Domain)

We love a good mystery… especially when it transports us to a time and place we could never go on our own. In Suzanne M. Wolfe’s new novel, A Murder by Any Name, readers are taken to Elizabethan England, where the queen’s ladies in waiting are being killed off one by one, and only one man can find the killer. This premise made us wonder if while researching this story, whether or not Ms. Wolfe discovered any disparities between how the Queen dealt with men versus women. If so, to what extent did fear play a factor in how she dealt with each gender? The author answers all our questions in today’s fascinating guest post. Enjoy! —J&H Read more of this post

Japan’s Sacred Peak Offers Quiet, Contemplation, and Murder in ‘Trial on Mount Koya’ [REVIEW]

Monk heading to Gobyo

A Buddhist temple may seem an unlikely place for a mystery, but Susan Spann’s ninja sleuth Hiro Hittori discovers death and treachery inside its walls in Trial on Mount Koya. (Photo by ccdoh1, Flickr)

A ninja and a priest walk into a Buddhist temple. Although it may sound like the beginning of a joke, it is actually the premise for the sixth installment of what is one of the most unusual and fascinating mystery series I’ve encountered in recent years. Penned by novelist Susan Spann, the latest Hiro Hattori novel, Trial on Mount Koya, reunites fans with her ninja sleuth and pays homage to one of the greatest mystery writers who ever lived, Dame Agatha Christie.
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