40 Years Later, Mary Higgins Clark’s ‘A Cry in the Night’ Is Still Creepy as Ever [REVIEW]

Woman afraid
Isolated and alone, will anyone hear her scream? (Photo courtesy Canva)

She’s a single mom struggling to make it in the big city. He’s a renowned artist from a remote farm in middle America. When they meet, it seems like kismet. Will their fairy tale romance last or will it become the stuff nightmares are made of? Find out in Mary Higgins Clark’s suspense classic, A Cry in the Night.

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John Grisham’s ‘The Racketeer’ Is Fun, Fast, and Reminiscent of His Classic Bestsellers [REVIEW]

Antigua
The Caribbean is a good place to hide. (Photo courtesy Canva)

He was a small-time lawyer learning to spread his wings. Then he got involved with the wrong client and was wrongly thrown in prison. But he has a plan, and if it works, he’ll get away scot free. Will the Feds buy what he’s selling? Find out in John Grisham’s The Racketeer.

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Danger Permeates Linda Hurtado Bond’s ‘All the Broken Girls’ [REVIEW]

Tampa, Florida sunset
There’s a killer loose in Tampa. (Photo courtesy Canva)

She’s a journalist whose career is on the ropes. He’s a homicide detective with a prep school education and little tolerance for unsubstantiated ideas. Can they learn to work together to stop a killer dead in his tracks, or will her past come back to haunt them both and put her out of a job once and for all? Find out in Linda Hurtado Bond’s All the Broken Girls.

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Stuart Woods’ ‘A Safe House’ is the Perfect Beach Read [REVIEW]

Old English manor house
Stone Barrington’s private English residence becomes a safe house to protect a high-profile client. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Someone is on the run. Someone with personal ties to high echelons of power. Only those connections are dangerous and want someone dead. When Stone Barrington is asked to step forward and offer someone protection, will he be able to keep his promise, or will this threat destroy them all? Find out in Stuart Woods’ A Safe House.

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Sandra SG Wong’s ‘In the Dark We Forget’ Makes Readers Question Their Own Biases [REVIEW]

Turquoise forest
(Photo courtesy Canva)

With her new psychological thriller, In the Dark We Forget, Sandra SG Wong (Devil Take the Hindmost) does everything but throw a toaster in our bath water to give us a jolt. Told in first person by an unreliable narrator with no memory, she thrusts readers into the woods, isolated and alone, and leaves us to discover along with her protagonist what she can’t recall and why she’s forgotten everything she’s ever known. Readers are in for an unexpected treat with this one.

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