Paul Walker’s ‘State of Treason’ [EXCERPT]

A Wedding Feast, c. 1569

Spy games play out in the midst of Elizabethan England in Paul Walker’s new historical thriller, State of Treason. (“A Wedding Feast, c. 1569” by Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder/Public Domain)

More than four centuries have passed since Queen Elizabeth I died, and yet we still seem as captivated as ever by the rich history of Elizabethan England during the 16th century. And why not? After all, it was a time when treachery and betrayal were rampant in both the government and the church, the bubonic plague claimed countless lives across multiple outbreaks, and both William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe competed to write the best plays London had ever seen. Now author Paul Walker uses this vibrant setting to create a new series of spy thrillers centered around a doctor who embraces both lore and science. We hope you enjoy this exclusive excerpt from State of Treason.J&H Read more of this post

‘A Duke in the Night’ Meets His Match [REVIEW]

Gaslights

London nights are full of dangerous possibilities. (Photo courtesy Canva)

A titled rogue. A stalwart headmistress. When their paths cross once again, will an old attraction catch fire, or will their personal differences impede romance? Find out in Kelly Bowen’s A Duke in the Night. Read more of this post

‘The Chocolate Maker’s Wife’ Takes A Stand in Restoration London [REVIEW]

Chocolate

Chocolate has never been so tempting. (Photo courtesy Canva)

An impoverished girl. An arranged marriage. Loads of decadent chocolate. In the midst of 17th-century London, a young woman’s dreams may come true or be shattered forever when she becomes The Chocolate Maker’s Wife in Karen Brooks’ new historical novel of sweet temptation.  Read more of this post

Christine Trent’s ‘A Murderous Malady’ [EXCERPT]

Florence Nightingale

When a murderer arrives in London, Florence Nightingale is on the case in Christine Trent’s A Murderous Malady.
(Photo courtesy Boston Public Library, Flickr)

 

I love a good old-fashioned mystery. There’s nothing more exciting than using my little grey cells to solve a crime, as Agatha Christie’s Belgian detective Hercule Poirot would say. I particularly enjoy when an author turns a historical figure into a sleuth, blending fiction and fact to create a story that simply jumps off the page. That’s exactly what Christine Trent has done with the legendary Florence Nightingale. In A Murderous Malady, she proves she’s just as effective at catching a villain as she is at healing the sick. We hope you enjoy this exclusive excerpt! —J&H
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Notting Hill Turns Deadly In Deborah Crombie’s ‘Garden of Lamentations’ [REVIEW]

hand in grass

When a woman is found dead in a Notting Hill garden, Gemma James is on the case in Deborah Crombie’s Garden of Lamentations. (Photo by Davidoff A, Flickr)

Two of Scotland Yard’s best detectives become embroiled in cases the complicate their personal lives in disturbing ways. Will they be able to solve these deadly mysteries before it is too late? Find out in Deborah Crombie’s latest novel, Garden of Lamentations. Read more of this post