DiNunzio and Rosato Refuse to Surrender in Lisa Scottoline’s ‘Feared’ [REVIEW]

Gavel

They may have beat him in court, but now he’s back to get even in Lisa Scottoline’s Feared. (Photo by SalFalko, Flickr)

A firm of women lawyers is targeted by an enemy from their past. What starts out as an irritating lawsuit soon turns into something far more deadly, and suddenly they must save their firm, their lives, and everything they have worked so hard to obtain. But will they be able to do so in time? Find out in Lisa Scottoline’s supercharged new thriller, Feared. 
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Fantasy and Reality Collide in ‘The Royal Order of Fighting Dragons’ [REVIEW]

The Royal Order of Fighting Dragons

A boy’s father dies in a freak accident. Or did he? When Ian learns the truth about his dad’s demise, he is forced to confront the unexpected truth in Dan Elish’s The Royal Order of Fighting Dragons. (Illustration by Sam Shearon)

Having tutored fifth grade students in the past, I am always on the lookout for stories which will captivate the imaginations of young readers. When Dan Elish’s The Royal Order of Fighting Dragons crossed my desk, I knew this would be a great title to add to my arsenal of middle grade fiction as soon as I started to read it.  Read more of this post

‘America for Beginners’ Should Be Required Reading for Everyone [REVIEW]

Road trip

A classic road trip becomes more than just a journey across the country in Leah Franqui’s America for Beginners. (Photo by Pok Rie on Pexels.com)

Soon after her husband’s death, and much to everyone’s dismay, a woman does the unthinkable: she leaves her homeland behind and travels to the United States to discover the truth regarding questions her deceased spouse would never answer. But will she like the answers she receives? Find out in Leah Franqui’s debut novel, America for Beginners.
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♦ Hope and Redemption are ‘What Blooms from Dust’ in James Markert’s New Novel [REVIEW]

A huge dust storm moves across the land during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.

A prodigal son. A child for sale. Both get a second chance in the midst of the 1930s Oklahoma Dust Bowl in James Markert’s What Blooms from Dust. (Photo courtesy US Department of Agriculture, Flickr)

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I have always loved survivor stories: those tales where people beat the odds, transform their lives, and wind up with something better. So it brings me great pleasure to bring you our latest Diamond Review title, James Markert’s What Blooms from Dust. In this redemptive story set against the 1930s Dust Bowl, we are introduced to what may likely become two of modern literature’s most unforgettable characters.
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♦ Ruth Hogan’s ‘The Keeper Of Lost Things’ Reminds Readers of What is Truly Important [REVIEW]

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A woman finds sanctuary in the beautiful home of an aging author in Ruth Hogan’s The Keeper of Lost Things. (Photo courtesy Pexels)

Diamond Review BannerDear reader,

If you enjoy stories that are insightful, thought provoking, and transcendent, you are going to love our latest Diamond Review title, Ruth Hogan’s The Keeper of Lost Things. This dazzling little gem of a book will draw you in with memorable characters guaranteed to win your heart, make you examine the world around you with fresh eyes, and prompt you to live a more significant existence.  Read more of this post