Discover the ‘Secrets of the National Parks’ with a Little Help From National Geographic [REVIEW]

Dawn is the best time to see the Grand Tetons from any vantage point. (Photo courtesy Canva)

If you have ever hit the wide open road in search of adventure at America’s gorgeous national parks, you were probably blown away by the experience. Whether you stood on the edge of the Grand Canyon staring down into its vast chasm or watched Old Faithful erupt in a stunning display of geothermal energy in the midst of Yellowstone, you might think you’ve really experienced the best these parks have to offer. But honey, you ain’t seen nothing yet! Leave it to National Geographic to pull the hair out of your eyes and lead you on a journey unlike no other. All you need is the second edition of their guidebook, Secrets of the National Parks. It’s like having a park ranger in your pocket.

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National Geographic’s ‘Guide to National Parks of the United States, Ninth Edition’ Helps Plan the Perfect Outdoor Adventure [REVIEW]

New Mexico’s Carlsbad Caverns has been a national park since 1930. (Photo courtesy Canva)

I have loved visiting national parks since my parents took my sister and I to places like the Grand Canyon and Carlsbad Caverns while on family vacations when we were kids. With 62 parks available across the country, there are always new adventures waiting to be had, and you don’t even have to travel outside our nation’s borders to enjoy them. The only problem is knowing where to go and what to do once you’re there. That’s when the ninth edition of National Geographic’s Guide to National Parks of the United States becomes an invaluable resource.

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Winston Groom’s ‘The Patriots’ Reveals the Figures Behind America’s Origin Story [REVIEW]

Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams
Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams (Artwork courtesy National Geographic)

Three powerful men. Three different backgrounds. Vastly disparate beliefs. Only one thing will be able to unite them: a nation born in fire. In The Patriots, bestselling author Winston Groom weaves the threads of their personal histories together and reveals how Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams dared to design the fabric of America.

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Learn to Imbibe Better with Tom Stevenson’s ‘The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia’ [REVIEW]

Discover the best wineries have to offer in The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia. (Photo courtesy Canva)

There are few things as relaxing as uncorking a delicious bottle of wine at the end of a long day, sipping it as you watch the sunset with someone special. Unless, of course, you get to travel to a winery on a languid afternoon and sample both new flavors and old vintages surrounded by the unrivaled beauty of wine country. But what wine should you try? Which vineyards are worth visiting? And how do you know how to stock that wine cellar you’ve always dreamed of filling? These are all questions wine expert Tom Stevenson helps you answer in The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia.

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In Ann Druyan’s ‘Cosmos: Possible Worlds,’ We All Help Shape Our Future [REVIEW]

Unleash your curiosity as you ponder the universe in Cosmos: Possible Worlds. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Back in high school, I really wasn’t that intrigued by science. It was all so complicated, and I just didn’t see how it really had much to do with me, so I didn’t pay much attention to it. But in college, I found myself in a class at the Cincinnati Zoo that introduced students to the wonderful, diverse, interconnected world of science through an interactive class where we studied animal and plant life, and suddenly I was riveted. Watching everything from gorillas and macaques to insects like bullet ants and cicadas, I discovered that every species of life makes a contribution to the planet, and why we need to understand and respect each one. And although not everyone can take a zoo class, they can read Ann Druyan’s new book, Cosmos: Possible Worlds, and find out for themselves just how approachable science really is, on our planet and beyond.

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