Winston Groom’s ‘The Patriots’ Reveals the Figures Behind America’s Origin Story [REVIEW]

Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams
Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams (Artwork courtesy National Geographic)

Three powerful men. Three different backgrounds. Vastly disparate beliefs. Only one thing will be able to unite them: a nation born in fire. In The Patriots, bestselling author Winston Groom weaves the threads of their personal histories together and reveals how Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams dared to design the fabric of America.

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Learn to Imbibe Better with Tom Stevenson’s ‘The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia’ [REVIEW]

Discover the best wineries have to offer in The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia. (Photo courtesy Canva)

There are few things as relaxing as uncorking a delicious bottle of wine at the end of a long day, sipping it as you watch the sunset with someone special. Unless, of course, you get to travel to a winery on a languid afternoon and sample both new flavors and old vintages surrounded by the unrivaled beauty of wine country. But what wine should you try? Which vineyards are worth visiting? And how do you know how to stock that wine cellar you’ve always dreamed of filling? These are all questions wine expert Tom Stevenson helps you answer in The New Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia.

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In Ann Druyan’s ‘Cosmos: Possible Worlds,’ We All Help Shape Our Future [REVIEW]

Unleash your curiosity as you ponder the universe in Cosmos: Possible Worlds. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Back in high school, I really wasn’t that intrigued by science. It was all so complicated, and I just didn’t see how it really had much to do with me, so I didn’t pay much attention to it. But in college, I found myself in a class at the Cincinnati Zoo that introduced students to the wonderful, diverse, interconnected world of science through an interactive class where we studied animal and plant life, and suddenly I was riveted. Watching everything from gorillas and macaques to insects like bullet ants and cicadas, I discovered that every species of life makes a contribution to the planet, and why we need to understand and respect each one. And although not everyone can take a zoo class, they can read Ann Druyan’s new book, Cosmos: Possible Worlds, and find out for themselves just how approachable science really is, on our planet and beyond.

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National Geographic’s ‘Family Reference Atlas of the World, Fifth Edition’ Offers Parents Homework Help During the Age of Distance Learning [REVIEW]

Earth
Discover the secrets of the known universe in National Geographic’s new Family Reference Atlas of the World. (Photo courtesy Canva)

The kids are distance learning. They have a report due about which countries have access to the internet. Where do you look? Or they need to write about ocean life and want to know how many species scientists have identified in the depths of the sea. How do you find that information? Search no more. A parent’s best new resource is here and National Geographic has got you covered with their fifth edition of the Family Reference Atlas of the World.

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From Coast to Coast, National Geographic’s ‘America the Beautiful’ Celebrates Everything That Makes the US Home [REVIEW]

Sunset over California beach
The afternoon sun sets across the golden shores of California’s Pacific Coast. (Photo courtesy Canva)

Over the years, I have lived on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the US, as well as in numerous states somewhere in the middle. And when I wasn’t exploring the communities I lived in, I could typically be found traveling, learning about other parts of this gorgeous country, marveling at its beauty, and absorbing its history and culture. But I have also loved meeting its people and hearing their stories.

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