‘The Lady Travelers Guide to Deception with an Unlikely Earl’ [EXCERPT]

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An adventurer and a writer learn a lesson in love in Victoria Alexander’s third Lady Travelers novel. (Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com)

You could call me a sucker for romantic comedy. I know, I know, it’s not the manliest thing to admit to, but there it is. And few writers can knock it out of the park like Victoria Alexander. She has a knack for throwing men and women together who are looking for anything but love, pitting them against a wild adventure, and spinning hilarious banter between everyone involved. The result is comic genius along the lines of Romancing the Stone, except placed in a historical setting. Read the following excerpt from Alexander’s latest novel, The Lady Travelers Guide to Deception with an Unlikely Earl, and you’ll see what I mean. Enjoy! —J.R. 
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Gideon Crew Takes One Last Adventure In Preston and Child’s ‘The Pharaoh Key’ [REVIEW]

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Gideon Crew goes on one last adventure in search of what may be his greatest discovery yet in Preston and Child’s The Pharaoh Key. (Photo by Phil Robinson, Flickr)

Time is running out for one legendary adventurer. Facing a death sentence, he wants to pursue one final treasure, perhaps the biggest of his career. But will he be able to accomplish his task in time? And will it prove to be the salvation he so desperately needs? Find out in Preston and Child’s fifth and final Gideon Crew novel, The Pharaoh Key. 
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Ken Follett’s Classic ‘The Key to Rebecca’ Remains One of the Best Espionage Books Ever Written [REVIEW]

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In the midst of World War II, a Nazi spy plots the downfall of the British in Egypt in Ken Follett’s classic thriller, The Key to Rebecca. (Photo by Tom Beazley/courtesy aussiejeff, Flickr)

Although we primarily feature new fiction on our site, every now and again we like to revisit a classic. Pulling an oldie but a goodie off the shelf and dusting it off to re-read it is akin to having brunch with an old friend to reminisce about cherished memories. And sometimes we simply feel like digging into a favorite author’s past works, ones me may have missed the first time around. That is what happened with Ken Follett’s classic, The Key to Rebecca.  Read more of this post