Linda Lael Miller’s ‘Always a Cowboy’ Offers an In-Depth Study of Human Behavior [REVIEW]

Wyoming stallions

The elusive stallions of Mustang Creek give quintessential cowboy Drake Carson a run for his money in Linda Lael Miller’s Always a Cowboy. (Photo by Adam Bailey, Flickr)

Mares are disappearing from Mustang Creek, and the stubborn middle brother of the Carson clan is doing everything he can to figure out why. So when a pretty horse expert shows up, the last thing he needs is someone telling him what to do. Watch the sparks fly in Linda Lael Miller’s latest book, Always a Cowboy, the second Carsons of Mustang Creek novel. 

Linda Lael Miller's ALWAYS A COWBOY

HQN Books

Drake Carson has his hands full as owner and manager of the Carson Ranch. Unbeknownst to him, his mother has invited her friend’s daughter to the family homestead to watch him interact with wild stallions, the subject of her PhD thesis. But the stallions are elusive and have become difficult for Drake to find and contain.

Luce Hale is able to look for the stallions and offers to lend her assistance to Drake as he searches for them. Stubborn to a fault, Drake doesn’t need her help, especially since he didn’t invite her to the ranch in the first place. Despite himself, however, he finds himself unwillingly attracted to Luce as they work together to find out what is happening to his mares.

As always, Miller has given us two realistic, flawed characters who are as charming as they are determined. Readers won’t be able to resist falling for Drake and Luce, or in getting caught up in the beautiful landscape of Wyoming horse country.

And just as much as Miller’s characters study horses, she has provided an in-depth study of human behavior. She makes us realize that accepting help from others isn’t a weakness, but shows strength of character.

Most of all, Miller raises a timeless question: can two independent, strong-willed people learn to put aside their differences long enough to fall in love? Linda Lael Miller doesn’t disappoint with Always a Cowboy. Romance readers will enjoy this thoughtful, engaging story.

Linda Lael Miller

Linda Lael Miller
(Photo by John Hall Photography)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

The daughter of a town marshal, Linda Lael Miller is the number one New York Times bestselling author of Always a CowboyOnce a Rancher, Montana Creeds: Tyler, and more than 100 other historical and contemporary novels, most of which reflect her love of the west. Raised in Northport, Washington, Miller lived in both London and Arizona and traveled the world before she returned to the state of her birth to settle down on a horse property outside Spokane.

She sold her first book, Fletcher’s Woman, in 1983 to Pocket Books. Since then, she’s written historical, contemporary, paranormal, mystery, and thriller fiction, but ultimately returned to writing novels with a Western flavor and was awarded the Nora Roberts Lifetime Achievement Award from the Romance Writers of America in 2007 for her devotion to the craft. Now the Hallmark Movie Channel is developing a series based on her Big Sky Country novels.

To find out more about Linda and her books, visit her home on the Web at lindalaelmiller.com and like her on Facebook.

ALWAYS A COWBOY
By Linda Lael Miller
384 pgs. HQN Books. $7.99

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About Heather Fink
Heather Fink is a writer, bibliophile and award-winning librarian who loves to introduce the next generation of readers to the wonderful world of books. She currently resides in Texas.

One Response to Linda Lael Miller’s ‘Always a Cowboy’ Offers an In-Depth Study of Human Behavior [REVIEW]

  1. Jathan Fink says:

    Reblogged this on Jadeworks Entertainment and commented:

    A hardheaded cowboy. A smart PhD student. These two are going to lock horns. Find out who wins the test of wills in Linda Lael Miller’s latest novel, Always a Cowboy.

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